The CBD oil industry is already a multi-million dollar market with projections of reaching $1 billion in product sales by 2020. Because hemp-based CBD doesn’t contain any THC, people don’t become high with every use – a unique characteristic that only increases the popularity of this cannabinoid compound. And with the federal reclassification of industrial hemp, all 50 states have become authorized to establish agricultural programs solely to cultivate industrial hemp – many for CBD extraction purposely. Analysts have even predicted the market for hemp-based CBD to soon surpass the legal marijuana industry.
Other potential side effects include low blood pressure, lightheadedness, and drowsiness, but these have typically only occurred in patients who have exceeded doses of 1,500 mg daily for a period of 4 weeks or more; far more than the average person will need take on a daily basis for chronic pain symptoms. (In fact, the majority of CBD users claim they find an effective dose to be anywhere between 10 and 40 mg daily).
Employee-owned Lazarus Naturals touts its commitment to ethical business practices, including pricing that aims to enable anyone to sample its range. Indeed, for veterans and those with long-term disabilities, there’s even a commendable 40-percent discount on the company’s wares. Customers wanting more bang for their buck could, then, try Lazarus Naturals’ 3,000 mg flavorless CBD tincture, a 60 ml bottle of which costs $125, though an even more potent 6,000 mg tincture is also available. Plus, the supplier’s handy and inexpensive taster packs may be a boon for more indecisive or novice CBD oil users. These packs come in regular and high-potency varieties, both of which contain samples of the company’s tinctures, capsules and CBD-infused coconut oil.
Recently, the Hemp Industries Association joined forces with RMH Holdings and Centuria Natural Food to challenge the law, asking the federal court to review the final rule on the grounds that it is arbitrary and unconstitutional. The opening brief, filed on April 3, 2017, accuses the DEA of failing to act in accordance with standard protocol for scheduling the newly prohibited substance under the Controlled Substances Act. 
×