“Your products are not generally recognized as safe and effective,” is a statement of “general” opinion just like opiates and sedatives are not generally recognized as “safe and effective.” And “Companies are processing large amounts of industrial hemp, which requires the use of harsh chemicals in order to extract enough CBD to be sold on the market” just like cigarettes and tobacco products “use harsh chemicals in order to extract…to be sold on the market.” Therefore, the leading cause of Cancer related deaths is legal to consume and a plant absolutely proven to help the human body combat Cancer is illegal. So, the DEAs’ classification as CBD being illegal…Is most def a GD joke. Don’t be ignorant, do your own research, read states’ compliance outlines and understand that any publication or organization that refers to Cannabis as Marijuana/Marihuana is against it’s legalization.
CO2 extraction is one of the most common ways CBD is extracted from the hemp or cannabis plants. This method uses expensive equipment that adjusts temperature and pressure to extract the cannabinoids from the plant material, without damaging them. The other common method is to use solvents like ethanol or butane to extract the plant material. These solvents have to be burned off the final product which may damage the cannabinoids or terpenes in the process. There is also a risk that these solvents may not have burned off completely and could end up in your end product.
Another marker of obesity and diabetes includes damage to liver cells. The liver is a major organ in the conversion between stored energy forms and useable energy forms in the body. Overburdening that system, such as with high fructose intake, can have disastrous effects. Inflammation within the liver indicates the onset of dysfunction, and possibly non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
Recently, the Hemp Industries Association joined forces with RMH Holdings and Centuria Natural Food to challenge the law, asking the federal court to review the final rule on the grounds that it is arbitrary and unconstitutional. The opening brief, filed on April 3, 2017, accuses the DEA of failing to act in accordance with standard protocol for scheduling the newly prohibited substance under the Controlled Substances Act.
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